Manual Me lo leggi? (Italian Edition)

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Rossoblu Rossoblu. Cento Pasta Bar. A short while later, Ms.

Italian polyglot speaking 6 languages (with SUBTITLES)

Serving the pasta in the pans is a typically Italian way of reminding you just how authentic the sauce is — and ours, respectively cheesy and peppery and earthy and ripe, were so authentic we nearly licked our pans clean. Later that day, showered and dressed for an evening out, my family and I went to Es Pujols, a lively town on the northern side of the island.

Es Pujols is the most Italian pocket of Formentera — many of the people who were walking on the boardwalk and sipping Campari and sodas spoke to us only in Italian when we tested our halting Spanish. We ordered aperitivi — Aperol and prosecco for my husband and me, San Pellegrino Aranciata for the children, plump green olives and salty potato chips for all.


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  • We sat quietly for a few minutes, and I could feel my skin radiating warmth from our time on the beach. A handful of Italian soccer players strolled by with their girlfriends. Soon, our waiter came over to take our order for dinner, but quickly apologized. Ca Na Pepa. Cafe Miranda. Come to this spot on the boardwalk in Es Pujolsa for a cafe macchiato in the morning or an Aperol spritz in the evening. Aim for the table under the fig tree, order whatever pasta the young Roman chef recommends, and enjoy it right from the pan Carrer de Santa Maria, 59, Sant Francesc Xavier; Overlooking the bobbing sailboats in the port of La Savina, this is one of the more formal places on the island, with its white tablecloths and elegantly prepared seafood.

    Obi Formentera. This island is made for Italians. It was time for lunch. He only spoke Italian. And Americans like to say their medical care is the best in the world, while Italians consider their National Health Service to be hopelessly dysfunctional.

    In the World Health Organization ranked the Italian system second-best on the planet. But that stellar rating was based solely on equality of access on the one hand and health outcomes such as life expectancy on the other, ignoring any on-the-ground realities in between: waiting times, emergency room efficiency, surgical statistics, etc. On many of those measures, they beat out the UK as well. First of all, universal access to medical care. During the year before the Affordable Care Act kicked in, one in six non-elderly American adults had no medical insurance at all, and a giddying 44 percent of all Americans were uninsured or underinsured at some point.

    Many year-abroad college students coming to Italy used to get coverage for the first time in their lives — I remember performing a first Pap smear on a year-old woman who had been sexually active since age Even if you venture outside the National Health Service to private doctors and hospitals, Italian healthcare is far less expensive. Italians, who rarely toss in more than a co-pay of a few euros, have been shown to be 60 percent more likely than Americans to take their medications as ordered. The salubrious Italian lifestyle does the rest.

    Even educated, insured, well-off Americans are sicker than their peers in other rich nations. The local version of the Mediterranean diet may be the healthiest in the world — rich in fruits and vegetables, low in animal fats. Their glass or two a day of wine is good for the heart, while they avoid alcoholism and hard drugs.

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    Close-knit families provide a buffer against both social isolation and penury. Copy their renowned diet, slim down, drink alcohol regularly but in moderation, use your feet instead of your car, stop packing pistols, lose the opiates, the coke, and the crystal meth. Secondly: reduce income inequality. And why not redistribute lifestyle too?

    Give working stiffs the same freedom to have kids maternity leave , convalesce sick leave , and relax proper vacations as the rich. But lesson number three, learned long ago by every developed country except the US, is feasible, and soon. America can, like Italy and the UK, provide universal access to treatment and medications, with minimal point-of-service payments and with prices kept down by government negotiation.

    Financial arrangements could be single-payer like Medicare or use private insurance companies as intermediaries as in Switzerland, without needing to copy the full Italian model of doctors on government salaries.

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    Americans will no longer stand for leaving vast numbers of the population uninsured, or denying medical coverage to people whose only sin is to be sick. Susan Levenstein is an American doctor who has been practicing in Italy for the past 40 years. Find out more on her blog, Stethoscope on Rome , and follow her on Twitter slevenstein.